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Ten Years of Walk Friendly Communities

The Walk Friendly Communities program, now celebrating its tenth year, recognizes cities throughout the United States for high levels of commitment to pedestrian safety. The program works to encourage walkable cities and towns by raising awareness of those who are promoting walkability and by educating decision-makers through resources and detailed feedback.

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New Walk Friendly Communities Recognized

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CHAPEL HILL, N.C., August 28, 2019—The Walk Friendly Communities program (WFC) recognized three U.S. cities for their commitment to prioritize pedestrians and create safe, comfortable and inviting places to walk. The Walk Friendly Community designations include a Platinum-level designation for Portland, Oregon, only the fourth community to receive that honor. Both Burlington, Vermont, and Bellevue, Washington, were recognized as Silver-level Walk Friendly Communities. Continue reading New Walk Friendly Communities Recognized

New Cities Recognized with Walk Friendly Designation

Walking Tour of the Wiggle Corridor, SFMTA Photo Department | May 5, 2018

CHAPEL HILL, N.C., April 16, 2019— The Walk Friendly Communities program (WFC) celebrated its ten-year anniversary with designations for four communities, recognizing their commitment to prioritize pedestrians and create safe, comfortable and inviting places to walk. The designations include a Platinum-level designation for San Francisco, CA, only the third community to receive that honor. Continue reading New Cities Recognized with Walk Friendly Designation

Walkable Places are Livable Places – Hartford, CT’s iQuilt Plan

illustration courtesy Veo Veo Design @veoveodesign

Walk Friendly Communities are supported by ambitious and comprehensive plans that tie together their activities to improve their streets. One example of an innovative plan is Hartford, CT’s iQuilt plan, which focuses on the connection between walkability and livability. The iQuilt plan aims to enrich the city through creation of a vibrant, appealing pedestrian network that weaves together the city’s cultural assets. Federal grants have helped the city achieve major objectives in this plan, and implementation of many building blocks of the plan is proceeding in Hartford.

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Walk Friendly Communities on the Road

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Walk Friendly Communities staff  is hitting the road in 2019, and we hope to see you at some of these excellent conferences across the United States.

 Active Living Conference 

When:  February 17-20, 2019

Where: Charleston, SC

Why Walk Friendly: The Active Living Conference convenes representatives from the realms of public health, transportation and beyond on issues relevant to expanding opportunities to bring active transportation and physical activity into everyday life. Walking is critical to healthy, active communities, and this conference is sure to produce big takeaways from both research and practice.

Main Street Now Conference 

When: March 25-27, 2019

Where: Seattle, WA

Why Walk Friendly: Historic, compact downtowns and neighborhoods are some of the most walkable places nationwide and are common in communities of all sizes. The Main Street Now Conference draws from the fields of planning, historic preservation, economic development and government staff/council members for engaging information exchange around enhancing these important districts.  Continue reading Walk Friendly Communities on the Road

Atlanta’s Path 400 Greenway : Creating Walkable Green Space along a Freeway Corridor

Freshly re-designated Walk Friendly Community Atlanta is working to improve the pedestrian environment in their city, and one area of focus is a growing urban trail system.  The multi-use trail dubbed Path400 is one of the newest links in the region’s expanding network of trails. Path400 utilizes right of way along State Route 400, which is primarily a highway corridor. The multi-use path takes advantage of existing right of way and underutilized grey infrastructure to create walkable green space and viable transportation connections for those on foot in the Buckhead area of Atlanta. The trail provides improved access to Metropolitan Atlanta Transit Authority (MARTA) bus and rail, enabling increased accessibility throughout Atlanta for pedestrians and transit users.

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Three Cities Renew Walk Friendly Designation

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The Walk Friendly Communities program (WFC) renewed designations for three communities for their commitment to prioritize pedestrians and create safe, comfortable and inviting places to walk.

These three cities were originally designated Walk Friendly Communities in 2013 based on their efforts to expand opportunities for walking and improve pedestrian safety across a wide range of programs and activities, from planning and design to outreach and law enforcement. Over the past five years, each community has continued to make strides toward improving conditions for pedestrians and creating people-friendly streets.

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Left Turn Traffic Calming Enhancing Pedestrian Safety in New York City

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As part of its Vision Zero initiative, New York City has been implementing and evaluating a set of traffic calming measures focused on left turns at intersections, based on findings from the Left Turn Pedestrian and Bicyclist Study. Since 2016, the city has installed treatments in over 200 intersections. Treatments such as a ‘hardened centerline’ slow left turning traffic and change the characteristics of the turning movement to increase safety. At these intersections, the city has documented reduced turning speeds and fewer incidents of crossing double yellow lines when turning left. Officials expect to find that crashes have been reduced, once the data are available for longer-term evaluation.

Traffic calming measures use physical and visual cues to slow traffic and minimize the number and severity of crashes, increasing safety and comfort for people walking and bicycling. Traffic calming is self-enforcing; the design of the roadway results in the desired effect and does not rely on behavioral interventions. If implemented correctly, traffic calming can be extremely effective in reducing crashes. Improved livability, which is not as easy to quantify, is an additional and equally important benefit derived from traffic calming.

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New Guide for Selecting Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Creating a safe, comfortable pedestrian network is key to encouraging walking. In every community, there are intersections and midblock locations without traffic control where pedestrians need to cross the street to reach a destination.

Pedestrian Refuge Island

The Federal Highway Administration’s recently published Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP) Guide to Improve Uncontrolled Crossings offers a set of cost effective safety countermeasures that communities can take to make crossing the street safer for people walking. Pedestrian crashes at uncontrolled crossings have been identified as a significant national safety problem. Applying the STEP countermeasures will improve safety while also enhancing livability and pedestrian accessibility.

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